Imagine!

An imagination is a wonderful thing…so is good music!

George Washington Inn
George Washington Inn

“I sat in the lush green grass of early summer, beneath the dappled shade of two young oak trees, a strong sun piercing the leafy canopy above my head. Delicate clumps of daffodils about my feet bowed gracefully as they prepared to retire after a long spring, adorning the lawns in front of this great house.

I imagined guests arriving up the long winding gravel driveway in horse and carriage, each and every one dressed in fine cloth from exotic far off lands. I imagined a small group of musicians sitting in the great hall welcoming the guests arrival, with the most up to date popular music. One of those pieces could very well have been this beautiful Sonata in F by the then very famous George Frideric Handel.” Johnnie Lawson, Muzica Clasica de Relaxare-Relaxation-Classical Music

There’s no need to imagine any longer. Make those dreams come true. Bring your lawn chairs or blanket this summer, relax on the inn’s front lawn and enjoy some of the finest baroque and early American folk music as it wafts through the ocean air from under the portico of George Washington Inn.

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Handel and his music

GFHandelGeorge Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in the same year as Bach (1685) to a family that was indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalized British subject in 1727. By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

Within fifteen years, Handel, a dramatic genius, had started three commercial opera companies to supply the English nobility with Italian opera, but the public came to hear the vocal bravura of the soloists rather than the music. In 1737 he had a physical breakdown, changed direction creatively and addressed the middle class. As Alexander’s Feast (1736) was well received, Handel made a transition to English choral works. After his success with Messiah (1742) he never performed an Italian opera again. Handel was only partly successful with his performances of English oratorio on mythical and biblical themes, but when he arranged a performance of Messiah to benefit the Foundling Hospital (1750) the criticism ended. It has been said that the passion of Handel’s oratorios is an ethical one, and that they are hallowed not by liturgical dignity but by the moral ideals of humanity.[2] Almost blind, and having lived in England for almost fifty years, he died in 1759, a respected and rich man.

Handel is regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time, with works such as Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks and Messiah remaining popular. Handel composed more than forty operas in over thirty years. (from Wikipedia)

The music of George Frideric Handel will be heard this summer at the inaugural Washington Music Festival. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear some baroque music that remains as radiant as ever!